Category Archives: 3D Prints

Library Workshop – Creating a 3D Printing Time Lapse

I recently did a workshop with my local library, the Algonquin Area Public Library District. Working with a group of about a dozen 4th through 8th graders, we selected an object to 3D print and then created a time-lapse video of the project. This provided a great opportunity to introduce the kids to 3D printing in a fun and exciting way, and it also introduced them to a variety of video production skills.

This workshop was conducted in two parts. The first part took place on a Friday. The second part took place the following Monday.

First, I showed them about a dozen objects from Thingiverse.com and let them vote on which one to print. While they were at first very excited about some of the Pokémon characters available, they ended up voting for this fun marble machine, by Tulio:

We then proceeded to get the print job setup. Since we were using an Ultimaker 3 3D printer for this project, we used the Cura slicing software to prepare the print job. 

This model was printed in PLA filament at 0.2mm layer height. No supports were needed.

Once the print job was setup, we positioned a webcam on a tripod in front of the 3D printer. Using a program called EvoCam, we took a snapshot of the print job every 15 seconds.

After getting the print job started and verifying that the snapshots were saving properly, we adjourned for the day and allowed the print job to run. As configured, the print job took about 39 hours to complete.

When we returned on Monday, we had a very nice print waiting for us:

Using a program called Zeitraffer, we combined the many snapshots of the print job into a time lapse video. At 30 frames per second, we ended up with a video of a little over 5 minutes. This would later be adjusted in the video editing phase to produce a shorter video.

Next, I provided the kids with choices of music to accompany their time-lapse video, and they voted for an upbeat piece called “Club Rock” which you’ll hear in the final video.

Using Final Cut Pro X, I showed them how to assemble the various pieces to produce the final video. We used some title slides, the above screenshots of Thingiverse and Cura, then the time-lapse video, shortened to about 1 minute, and then we inserted some footage showing the kids assembling and testing the marble machine. After adding our chosen music and inserting transitions, we were ready to produce our video and publish it to YouTube!

The kids had a lot of fun with this workshop, as did I. If you’re looking to introduce kids to 3D printing in a fun and engaging way, I recommend a project like this. Too often, the things produced by 3D printers are just static objects. In this case, you end up with a fun marble machine with moving parts that the kids can actually play with.

The “marbles” we used in the marble machine are 9.5mm steel ball bearings, which you can purchase at your local hardware store.

Here’s the final video:

You can find the Marble Machine 3D printable model here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1385312

To learn more about the Algonquin Area Public Library District, please visit: http://www.aapld.org

Upgrade Your Ultimaker 2 to an Ultimaker 2+

I recently installed Ultimaker’s Extrusion Upgrade Kit on my Ultimaker 2, upgrading it to an Ultimaker 2+. I couldn’t be happier with the results! It’s like a whole new 3D printer!

I’ve been using the Ultimaker 2 for a couple of years now, and I was very happy with the printer overall. Out of all the desktop 3D printers I’ve tested, the Ultimaker 2 stood out as one of the best available. However, I occasionally would run into issues with the feeder mechanism. Sometimes, the filament would slip or the feeder would grind into the filament. This would sometimes lead to failed prints. I noticed this problem especially on prints with heavy retractions.

As an example, check out the photo below. I tried printing this on my Ultimaker 2, before installing the upgrade kit, and the print failed about half-way through. When it got to the part with all those small arches, it had too many retractions for the printer to handle. The filament was ground down by the feeder mechanism, leading to an “air print”.

After installing the Extrusion Upgrade Kit, this was the first print I tried, and it worked flawlessly! Since then, I’ve printed all sorts of things, with almost no failed prints. The difference the upgrade kit made is very noticeable.

Castle Printed on the Ultimaker 2+

The Ultimaker Extrusion Upgrade Kit retails for $395 in the USA, and each kit includes the following:

  • Fully assembled print head
  • Swappable nozzles aka Olsson Block (includes 0.25mm, 0.4mm, 0.6mm, and 0.8mm nozzles)
  • Geared feeder motor
  • Geared feeder
  • Print head shafts
  • Ultimaker calibration card
  • Filament reel holder
  • Axis tools
  • Build plate clamps
  • New ‘+’ stickers

Ultimaker Extrusion Upgrade Kit

Detailed installation instructions can be found here: https://ultimaker.com/en/resources/19641-installing-the-extrusion-upgrade-kit

Just follow the instructions, and you’ll be finished with your upgrade in about an hour.

If you have an Ultimaker 2 or Ultimaker 2 Extended, I strongly encourage you to consider the Ultimaker Extrusion Upgrade Kit! It’s like having a completely new printer!

Buy your Ultimaker Extrusion Upgrade Kit here:

Ultimaker Extrusion Upgrade Kit

 

Star Wars Fans Create BB8 Models Using 3D Printers

This article is shared from 3Ders.org. You can read the full article here.

BB8 Builder’s Club, is growing organization of 1800+ that is focused on building home-brewed BB8’s. As of “October the BB-8th”, they are now officially recognized by LucasFilm Ltd. Moreover, they have publicly released the STL files for 3D printing the parts. You can learn more, and even join, the BB8 Builder’s Club here.

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Also, completely independent of the BB8 Builder’s Club, “part-time makergeek” Jean-René Bédard has developed his own BB8, as well. His droid is 3D-printed, remote-controlled,  managed by Arduino circuits and stands on its own two wheels. You can read the full story here, at 3ders.org.

This article features Ultimaker 3D printers, which are available for purchase from Shop3DUniverse.com.

GoPro Mouth Mount: Entrepeneur spots a need and uses 3D printing to start a very cool business.

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Steve Mara loves to surf. He loves it so much that he moved from the Midwest to San Diego 5 years ago so he could surf every day.

A couple of years ago, Steve noticed a new trend: pro surfers playing with different ways to hold their GoPro cameras while surfing.

Until then, GoPro cameras had been attached to the nose of the surfboard with the camera pointing back at the surfer. This produced fun video clips, but the focus was on the surfer, not what the surfer was seeing and experiencing.

Steve noticed pro surfers rigging their own mouth mounts, sometimes just biting on a piece of plastic or foam they attached to the GoPro. It wasn’t comfortable, but it delivered great surfing shots from inside “the barrel.”

Last summer, Steve talked with some of his engineering friends, who thought it wouldn’t be too difficult or expensive to manufacture a mouth mount. Encouraged, and liking the idea of a challenge, Steve decided to move forward.

His starting point was a silicone scuba mouthpiece attached to the custom mount piece. Another friend drew up a rough design in SolidWorks, and Steve began to search for a place to 3D print a prototype. Brick and mortar print shops in his local area were too expensive, and online possibilities had too long of a turnaround time for an eager entrepreneur who wanted to hold the prototype in his own hands, soon.

Steve has a smart girlfriend, who told him the public library had a free 3D printing lab and didn’t even charge for the filament! Although library policy only allowed people to print items they designed themselves, they allowed Steve to print his friend’s design one time. Although it took two hours to print, the time was well-used since the lab assistant taught Steve about 3D printing and design.

Finally Steve was able to take the printed prototype home and test it with his GoPro. A fast learner (during those two hours waiting in the library 3D printing lab), Steve was able to make some major modifications using several different editing programs. His new prototype used much less filament and considerably less time, about 45 minutes. A couple more tweaks, and it was time to “go pro,” with a professional design and manufacturing.

3D printing a prototype GoPro Mouth Mount.
3D printing a prototype GoPro Mouth Mount.
The finished 3D printed prototype GoPro Mouth Mount.
The finished 3D printed prototype GoPro Mouth Mount.

For the design, Steve turned to oDesk.com and for a modest sum was able to get a professional design with the exact measurements he needed. After 3D printing that design successfully, it was time to manufacture the product. The final product is made from polycarbonate to make it as durable as possible.

And now, with the help of 3D printing for his prototypes, Steve has been able to make his idea a concrete reality. Just 9 months into his business, he has already sold hundreds of mouth mounts!

Check out the videos on Steve’s website, http://hostevie.com/shop/gopro-mouth-mount.html, taken with the GoPro Mouth Mount. Steve’s friends are riding the waves, and you can almost feel the surf as you take an exciting and beautiful ride with them from your armchair!

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3D Printing: Coming Soon to Kitchens Everywhere

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How 3D printing freed the slave in my kitchen

I’m a foodie, and I love to cook. Naturally all the buzz about 3D printed food stimulated my curiosity. I have discovered very interesting possibilities and wonderfully useful applications . . . but probably not yet for my kitchen. Does that mean there’s no place for 3D printing in my kitchen today? Not at all!

I use a lot of lemons in my cooking. Awhile back I was chatting with a next door neighbor, complaining about the shape, cumbersomeness and relative ineffectiveness of lemon juicers currently on the market. Short of getting a professional juicer like I used to have in my cafe, there isn’t much I like.

Did I mention that my next door neighbor owns a 3D printer? The next morning I received a beautiful 3D printed lemon juicer. It was love at first sight. I knew immediately it would be the  BEST lemon juicer I have ever had. One minute later, my neighbor had fresh lemonade!

Having a 3D printed lemon juicer in my kitchen may seem like a small thing, but like I said, I squeeze a lot of lemons when I cook. And now I’m free from a little bit of kitchen drudgery! Not only that – I can make lemonade in a heartbeat.

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The Real Lemonade Revolution: brought to you by 3D printing

A few years ago I offered a glass of freshly squeezed lemonade to a 20+ employee. She took a sip and had a stunned look on her face. “Amazing,” she said. Noting her ecstasy over the drink, I wondered if it was possible she had never had real lemonade before? Sure enough, prior to this moment lemonade for her was something made with water and canned powder. She had no idea you could just make lemonade from . . . well, real lemons.

Have you ever compared the ingredient list on a lemon with the ingredient list on one of those cans of lemonade mix? Here is a typical powdered lemonade mix ingredient list: Sugar, Fructose, Citric Acid, Less Than 2% Of Natural Flavor, Ascorbic Acid, Maltodextrin, Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate, Sodium Citrate, Magnesium Oxide, Calcium Fumarate, Artificial Color, Yellow 5 Lake, Tocopherol.

Compare that list to: Lemon. No wonder my employee was so amazed with that glass of fresh lemonade I handed her.

Now you, too, can make fresh lemonade faster than you can open that can of powdered mix, just in time for summer – with a 3D printed juicer. I’m going to have one made for everyone I know this year.

Three more MUST-HAVE 3D Printed Kitchen Tools & lots more

I love my 3D printed juicer so much. It started me wondering, what other ways could 3D printing transform my life in the kitchen? Here are a few things I found that I want to try.

For now, I’m going to go enjoy a tall glass of fresh, 3D printed juicer lemonade and figure out how I’m going to hit up my favorite 3D printer owning neighbor for a Cheese Press.

The “Juicy Juicer” featured in this article can be found on Thingiverse, here. Model credit: Procrastinator.

Follow us on Twitter (@3dprintingisfun) and like us on Facebook. Subscribe to this blog, or visit us at shop3duniverse.com.

Using Simplify3D to Print an Entire Cyborg Beast Prosthetic Hand on a Single 6 x 9″ Build Plate �

I recently taught my wife how to setup 3D prints using Simplify3D. She’s a natural and was setting up her very first print job within 10 minutes, with me helping only with verbal pointers from time to time.

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These days, most of what I print is prosthetic limbs, so I was teaching Alina how to setup a print job for a Cyborg Beast e-NABLE Hand. It’s a pretty advanced print job to start off with. For best results, the support material needs to be customized so it only goes in specific places, which Simplify3D allows you to do, as shown here.

As if this print job wasn’t challenging enough already, Alina proposed something really interesting. I normally print a Cyborg Beast in two print jobs – one for all the hand parts, and another for the “gauntlet” – the part that fits over the arm. As Alina was setting up her very first print job, she asked if we could just position the smaller parts underneath the bigger parts. We did a test, and it came out surprisingly well! Check out the video (10 minutes) here.

To make a 3D printed hand for someone who needs one, please visit:
http://www.facebook.com/enableorganization
http://enablingthefuture.org

To buy Simplify3D, please visit:
http://shop3duniverse.com/products/simplify3d-software

To buy a FlashForge Creator X, please visit:
http://shop3duniverse.com/collections/3d-printers/products/flashforge-creator-x

To buy a kit with the assembly materials you need to make your own Cyborg Beast 3D printed hand, please visit:
http://shop3duniverse.com/collections/3d-printable-kits/products/e-nable-hand-assembly-materials-kit-cyborg-beast-edition

A New Hand for Lily

This 8-year old girl named Lily is going to get a new left hand soon. I just finished printing it for her! There are photos below and a video showing the fully assembled prosthesis.

Lily is in 2nd grade, and she is now attending her third elementary school because other kids have relentlessly teased her about missing her left hand (and part of her left arm). Her current math teacher found out about 3D printed prosthetics on the Internet and shared a video with his class (including Lily), asking if she might like one. Now, she has more friends than she knows what to do with, and she hasn’t even gotten the prosthesis yet!

Historically, a customized prosthesis like this would cost anywhere from $10,000 to $80,000. The total cost of this one – less than $50 and some of my time! Start to finish, this took two days to 3D print and assemble. This is a perfect example of why people say that 3D printing is such a transformational technology.

If you have a 3D printer and would like to explore making prosthetics for those who need them, please visit e-Nable. Anyone can do this, as you can see in the assembly video I did recently.

About 1 in every 1000 children is born with a condition called Amniotic Band Syndrome, which results in missing fingers or other defects. And of course, there are our veterans and others who have lost fingers or limbs in the line of duty, on the job, from illness, etc. So please, get involved!

This prosthesis was printed in “Bridge” nylon, a new material from Taulman 3D. This filament has excellent strength properties, as well as being heat and chemical resistant. It has been formulated to address the challenges encountered when printing with other nylon filaments. For more information, visit http://taulman3d.com/index.html.

To download the model for this prosthesis, the Cyborg Beast:

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How to Assemble the “Tendon” Lines for the Cyborg Beast 3D Printed Prosthesis

After posting another video showing the overall assembly process for the Cyborg Beast 3D printed prosthesis, I was asked to show some details specifically for the process of installing the two types of cords used as tendons in this design.

So here’s Part 2 of Assembling the Cyborg Beast, showing a close-up view of how to install those tendon lines.

A big thanks to the great work of those who contributed to the Cyborg Beast prosthesis, including Jorge Zuniga, Frankie Flood, Ivan Owen, David Orgeman, and others in the e-Nable community.

For more information about the e-Nable community, please visit http://enablingthefuture.org.

Assembling and Testing the Cyborg Beast 3D Printed Prosthesis

One of the most exciting things going on in 3D printing these days is what’s happening with 3D printed prosthetics. In particular, the e-Nable community, a group of 500 people and growing, is working to continually evolve the available options for low-cost 3D printed prosthetics. These talented folks from around the globe are creating designs that anyone can produce and assemble, wherever needed.

As a demonstration of that, here’s a video of me assembling one for the first time. I have no background in prosthetics or mechanical engineering, so if I can do this, anyone can. Of course, a prosthetist or other medical professional should always be involved when doing one of these for real, in order to ensure proper fit, check periodically for irritation, etc.

Cyborg Beast Test

A big thanks to the great work of those who contributed to the Cyborg Beast prosthesis, including Jorge Zuniga, Frankie Flood, Ivan Owen, David Orgeman, and others in the e-Nable community.

For more information about the e-Nable community, please visit http://enablingthefuture.org.

 

Here are some photos of the assembled prosthesis. Click on an image for the full-sized version.

Video Review of Taulman 3D’s New Bridge Nylon Filament

Taulman 3D recently released a new nylon filament called “Bridge”, so named because it bridges the excellent qualities of other nylon filaments with the lower cost and ease of use found in more common ABS and PLA filaments.

Unlike other Nylon filaments, this one can be printed on glass, with a thin coat of PVA glue. Bed adhesion and warping challenges have been significantly reduced. This filament also absorbs much less moisture than previous nylon filaments.

Here’s a video review.

Purchase the Taulman Nylon Filament at shop3duniverse.com.

The Flexy-Hand 3D Printed Prosthesis (Proof of Concept)

So I’ve been focusing a lot on 3D printed prosthetics lately. What better way to put a machine like this to good use? Recently, this Flexy-Hand design appeared on Thingiverse, and I knew I had to make one…

Flexy-Hand 6

Check out my video review here.

The model is available on Thingiverse, here.

Credit for the design goes to Steve Wood, founder of Gyrobot,

And here are some more photos. Click on the photos for a full resolution version.

Flexy-Hand 1

 

Flexy-Hand 3

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Flexy-Hand 4

Flexy-Hand 2

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Diamond Vase (Math Art by Dizingof)

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Believe it or not, this is a mathematical equation you are looking at. This is another model by Dizingof, a very talented 3D artist.

This was printed in ABS at 0.15mm layer height, then treated with acetone vapor to give it a smooth finish.

A time-lapse video of the print can be found here. This is one of my favorite time-lapse videos. It’s kind of like watching a sunrise!

This model can be found here, and the rest of Dizingof’s work can be seen here.

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“Equation” (Math Art by Dizingof)

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Isn’t math beautiful? When a mathematical equation is rendered in 3D and then 3D printed, patterns and forms emerge, reminiscent of images found in nature. Hold something like this in your hands, and a new appreciation for math can be found.

This was printed in ABS at 0.15mm layer height, then treated with acetone vapor to give it a smooth finish.

A time-lapse video of the print can be found here.

The model is by Dizingof, my favorite 3D artist. This model can be found here, and the rest of his work can be seen here.

Cellular Cocoon Vase, with Acetone Vapor Treatment

Cellular Cocoon Vase, by Dizingof, with Acetone Vapor Treatment

This vase was printed in ABS at 0.15mm layer height. I kept the print speed pretty slow due to all of the details and overhangs, so this took about 24 hours to print.

After printing, I treated the whole thing in an acetone vapor bath (using a large deep fryer and a version of the method outlined by Austin Wilson and Neil Underwood here.)

A time-lapse video of the print can be found here.

The model can be found here. Model credit: Dizingof (aka Asher Nahmias)

 

3D Printed Architectural Design Brings an Idea to Life

As I’ve said before, 3D printing has the power to bring ideas to life in a very real way. Here’s an example of how well this works for the smaller ideas as well as the big ones.

For the last 4+ years, my mom has owned and operated a wonderful vegetarian café in Woodstock, IL, called Expressly Leslie Vegetarian Specialties. You can check it out here.

We recently discussed possibilities for creating a Health-Department-approved production kitchen in her home so she could prepare certain dishes on a larger scale than what she can produce at the current café.

She laid out a design for a small production kitchen that would fit in a corner of her basement, and drew the following for me as an illustration:

Initial sketch of a design for a small production kitchen
Initial sketch of a design for a small production kitchen

I decided to surprise her by not only designing a 3D model of her concept kitchen, but also 3D printing a physical model of it for her. So I did a bit of searching and found a free piece of software for designing homes (or rooms in this case) that is able to export in a standard 3D file format. Using SweetHome3D (link below), I put together the following according to her instructions:

Production Kitchen Design - 2D View
Production Kitchen Design – 2D View
Production Kitchen Design - 3D View
Production Kitchen Design – 3D View

 

SweetHome3D lets you export as a Wavefront OBJ file. But when you export a room by default, it does not include the floor, which I wanted in my print. To get around this, I created a “wall” but set it to only 2″ high and with X and Y dimensions slightly larger than the rest of the room. Then, I edited the properties for each object in the room to increase the elevation value by 2″ so it would sit on top of the floor. There might be a better way to do this in the software, but I couldn’t find it, and this worked well for my needs.

I then used Blender (link below) to import the OBJ file and export it as an STL file. From there, I brought it into Slic3r and prepared it for printing.

And here is the result:

3D Printed Model of a Small Production Kitchen Design
3D Printed Model of a Small Production Kitchen Design

As is common with objects with large, flat surfaces like this one, there were some problems with warping and delamination. I treated those the best I could by brushing on a bit of acetone to seal those gaps as they appeared, but some of the issues occurred while I was sleeping and are still visible in the final print.

After printing, I treated the whole thing in an acetone vapor bath (using a large deep fryer and a version of the method outlined by Austin Wilson and Neil Underwood here.)

A time-lapse video of the print can be found here.

The model I used for the 3D printed sign on the font can be found here. Model credit: Steven Morlock

SweetHome3D software can be found here.

Blender software can be found here.

 

3D Printed Marble Display Stand, Designed by a 10-Year-Old

I had a terrific experience today. Yesterday evening, my 10-year-old son came to me with a drawing of a display stand he wanted to make for his favorite marbles (yes, it’s okay to laugh at that). The marbles were of different diameters, and he wanted the stand to have a square base with cylindrical towers to hold each marble. He had very specific instructions on how tall he wanted each tower to be.

So, he went off to bed, and I started to learn some 3D modeling (which I have never done before, so please don’t laugh at my almost non-existent modeling skills).

Here’s what he gave me (I added in marble measurements so I’d know how to size each tower):

Initial Sketch of Marble Display Stand
Initial Sketch of Marble Display Stand

And here’s what I modeled:

3D Model of Marble Display Stand
3D Model of Marble Display Stand

So, I started it printing and went to bed myself. When we woke up in the morning, this was waiting for us:

3D Printed  Marble Display Stand
3D Printed Marble Display Stand

Zachary (my son) arranged his marbles and found that everything fit perfectly!

 

3D Printed Marble Display Stand, with Marbles
3D Printed Marble Display Stand, with Marbles

The look on his face when he saw this was priceless! I could tell that this made a huge impact on him. He had an idea, sketched it out, and then we brought that idea into physical form – from his head to the real world in just a few hours.

My wife and I homeschool Zachary, and it’s clear that 3D printing is going to be an important part of his education. It’s no wonder that schools and libraries across the country are installing 3D printers. Much like kids in my generation grew up with computers, Zachary’s generation is going to grow up with 3D printing. The thought of having a new idea for an object and then printing out a physical model of it may seem somewhat magical to us, but it will seem very normal to our children. Over time, this will help us as a society to become co-creators, rather than mere consumers.

 

A time-lapse video of the print can be found here: http://youtu.be/x_CIL2l2pcs

And if for some strange reason, you want to print one of these for yourself, you can download the model here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:206589 (model credit: Zachary S.)

 

Twisted Vase Printed in Taulman T-Glase

Twisted Vase Printed with Taulman T-Glase

I’m really enjoying this Taulman T-Glase material. It has great optical properties, as you can see in the photo. It sticks great to Kapton tape, and it prints at about the same temperature as ABS, so my setup doesn’t even need any changes to print with T-Glase.

Taulman also has T-Glase in color. The only print difference is that the dyes for PETT retain heat longer, so you’ll want to make sure your material fan is “ON”. Also, as the dyes are molecular solids, they inhibit the light pipe capability, so
users will have to use colored lights and clear t-glase with light pipe designs. (For a description and photos of light pipes, see the bottom of this page: http://www.taulman3d.com/t-glase-features.html)

A time-lapse video of the print can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_59s8gGgYJw

The model can be found here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:18672  (model credit: Maak Mijn Idee)

You can find more info or buy Taulman T-Glase here: http://taulman3d.com/t-glase-features.html

Vase Printed in Taulman T-Glase

Vase Made with Taulman T-Glase

Beautiful, isn’t it? Click on the photo for the full resolution version.

This material just arrived today. It’s Taulman T-Glase (short for “Tough Glass”).  This stuff is nylon based, so it’s super-strong, it has terrific optical properties, and it’s FDA approved for direct food contact. It’s also fully reclaimable, so you can melt down failed prints and extrude new filament from it. You can even mix in up to 12% of the total weight with plastic water bottles!

I think this is going to be really nice for jewelry, like earrings and bracelets. Going to try some of those out soon.

This vase came out nicely, except for some minor layering defects near the top, where it curves outward. I should be able to correct that by reducing the print speed as it approaches that part of the print.

A time-lapse video of the print can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyfqfqMWJ48

The model can be found here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:104694 (model credit: Håkan Langemark)

You can find more info or buy Taulman T-Glase here: http://taulman3d.com/t-glase-features.html

Cat Drinking Pond

Cat Pond

We recently adopted two kittens, so I decided to print this out for their water dish. The threaded port is sized for a 1-liter bottle, so you just screw in a bottle of water, then you don’t have to worry about refilling the water dish for a while. This was printed in PLA, which is a bio-degradable plastic – safe for the kitties!

The model can be found here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:38224 (model credit: JohK)

Dual Extrusion Rhombic Dodecahedra Chain

Rhombic Dodecahedra

This was a very cool print… This object is designed specifically for the Replicator 1 Dual printer. The individual segments of the object are spaced exactly as far apart as the two extruders on the printer. This means that if you load one color into each extruder and then enable ditto printing (which causes both extruders to do exactly the same thing at the same time, rather than working one at a time), then it prints out exactly as shown above. Kudos to Emmett Lalish, who designed this object!

The model can be found here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:31151 (model credit: Emmett Lalish)

Diagrid Bracelet

Diagrid Bracelet

I’ve made about a half-dozen of these so far. My wife keeps giving them away to people so I have to keep making new ones (which is fine with me).

The model can be found here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:7045 (model credit: Jessica and Jesse from Nervous System, http://n-e-r-v-o-u-s.com)

A time-lapse video of the print can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvRzQnx-_ec

4-Stage Planetary Gears

4-Stage Planetary Gears

There’s no better feeling than printing something like this, then taking the pieces off the build plate and assembling them, only to find everything fits perfectly and works smoothly. This part also comes with a drill bit insert you can replace the handle with. Then you can use a power drill to turn the gears really fast. Even running a power drill at top speed, these gears work flawlessly!

The model can be found here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:23030 (model credit: aubenc)

A time-lapse video of the print can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n94G-tNsSPo

Polyhedron by Leonardo da Vinci

Polyhedron by Leonardo da Vinci

I printed a small version of this, about 2 inches in diameter. My son liked it and asked me to print a bigger one in red. This required printing will full support, and at this size, it took a long time to finish – about 18 hours. This was printed in ABS @ 0.2mm layer height.

The model can be found here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:156482 (model credit: Roger Peng)

Coin Traps

Coin Traps

This is one of my favorites. The coin is too big to be removed through any of the holes, so anyone you show this to who isn’t familiar with 3D printing won’t be able to figure out how you got the coins in there. The trick is to print it half way, pause the print and drop the coin in, then finish the print.

The model can be found here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:193941 (model credit: mathgrrl)